The History of Bolton-le-Sands

Bolton-le-Sands was referred to as Bodeltone in the Domesday book, the village was known as Bolton until the arrival of the railways, when the name was changed to Bolton-le-Sands to differentiate from similarly named towns on the same line.

The oldest church in the village, founded prior to 1094, is the Church of England Holy Trinity church, originally dedicated to St Michael. The oldest part of the current building is the tower, supposed to have been built around 1500. The nave and chancel date from the 19th century. The other churches are the Roman Catholic St Mary of the Angels and the Christ Church United Reformed Church.

The Lancaster Canal, built in the 1790s, is a major feature of the village. Also passing through the village is the A6 and the West Coast Main Line, although the railway station closed in 1969.

The village has one school, Bolton-le-Sands Church of England Primary School, with around 300 pupils from the ages of 4 to 11 in a modern school building.

The school is a successor to the old Boys’ Free Grammar School, which dates from 1657, with the 19th century school building still used for community education.

The school building was also home to the Bolton-le-Sands library until 1973, when the library was moved into a newly built site in the village centre.

old-grammar-school

During Dummer’s War, the first permanent British settlement was established in 1724, with the construction of Fort Dummer. It was to protect the nearby settlements of Dummerston and Brattleboro.

  • From 1731 to 1734
  • Through the 1763
  • On March 20, 1764
  • From 1731 to 1734, the French constructed Fort St. Frédéric, which gave the French control of the New France/Vermont frontier region in the Lake Champlain Valley. With the outbreak of the French and Indian War in 1754, the North American front of the Seven Years’ War between the French and English, the French began construction of Fort Carillon at present-day Ticonderoga, New York in 1755. The British failed to take Fort St. Frédéric or Fort Carillon between 1755 and 1758. In 1759, a combined force of 12,000 British regular and provincial troops under Sir Jeffery Amherst captured Carillon, after which the French abandoned Fort St. Frédéric. Amherst constructed Fort Crown Point next to the remains of the Fort St. Frédéric, securing British control over the area.

  • Following France’s loss in the French and Indian War, through the 1763 Treaty of Paris they ceded control of the land to the British. Colonial settlement was limited by the Crown to lands east of the Appalachians, in order to try to end encroachment on Native American lands. The territory of Vermont was divided nearly in half in a jagged line running from Fort William Henry in Lake George diagonally north-eastward to Lake Memphremagog. With the end of the war, new settlers arrived in Vermont. Ultimately, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New York all claimed this frontier area.

  • On March 20, 1764, King George III established the boundary between New Hampshire and New York along the west bank of the Connecticut River, north of Massachusetts, and south of 45 degrees north latitude. In 1770, Ethan Allen, his brothers Ira and Levi, and Seth Warner, recruited an informal militia known as the Green Mountain Boys to protect the interests of the original New Hampshire settlers against newcomers from New York.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Vermont, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.